Ceredigion is defined by rivers. Two great estuaries – the Dyfi in the north and the Teifi in the south – form its natural boundaries  whilst the  ‘abers’ have given Ceredigion its main harbour towns of Aberteifi (Cardigan), Aberaeron and Aberystwyth. The Teifi and the Dyfi estuaries are natural havens for wildlife, as are the wooded slopes of Ceredigion's lesser rivers which tumble over waterfalls and rapids from the Cambrian Mountains. 


The landscape of Ceredigion has been formed over millennia by dramatic movements of ice and the power of water sculpting deep gorges in the uplands and lush river valleys in the lowlands. But the hand of man can also been seen as the power of water has been harnessed in reservoirs and diverted for industry and pleasure.

 

The Dyfi Biosphere

The Dyfi river forms the natural northern boundary of Ceredigion, and is also considered by many to be the boundary between north and south Wales. The great estuary of the Dyfi is flanked by the mountains of Snowdonia and the Cambrian range to the north and east, whilst on its southern banks in Ceredigion is the largest extent of lowland bog in Britain - Cors Fochno - rich in wildlife and steeped in legends.

The Dyfi Biosphere


O'r mynydd i'r môr ar hyd yr afon Rheidol

Mae afon Rheidol yn tarddu yn Llyn Llygad Rheidol ar lethrau Pumlumon, copa uchaf Mynyddoedd Cambria. Mae’r afon yn disgyn yn serth ac yn gyflym i’r môr drwy dirwedd goediog ddramatig. 

O'r mynydd i'r môr ar hyd yr afon Rheidol


Ystwyth valley

According to the UK’s official mapping agency, The Ordnance Survey, the centre point of Wales is on a hillside above the upper reaches of the Yswyth river in Cwmystwyth.

Ystwyth valley


Aeron valley and the Mynydd Bach

The Aeron valley stretches from the colourful harbour town of Aberaeron on the Ceredigion coast, to its source at Llyn Eiddwen near the summit of Mynydd Bach.  The Arth ( the 'bear') also rises on these slopes and tumbles a short seven miles from source to sea. 

Aeron valley and the Mynydd Bach


The Teifi and its tributaries

The Teifi defines the southern border of Ceredigion. Rising at the remote Teifi Pools in the Cambrian Mountains, it progresses through wildlife rich wetlands and farmland, and speeds through narrow gorges before reaching the sea at Aberteifi - the historic port town of Cardigan. Bronze and Iron Age hillforts and burial cairns litter the hills along its banks, whilst the river itself, is one of the most renowned fishing rivers in the country.

The Teifi and its tributaries